A doctor examines a larva of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the carrier of Zika virus, in a laboratory of the Ministry of Health, in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Jan. 29, 2016. The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday said it would convene an International Health Regulations emergency committee on the Zika virus to ascertain whether the outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern.(Xinhua/Kent Gilbert) (jp) (sp)
A doctor examines a larva of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the carrier of Zika virus, in a laboratory of the Ministry of Health, in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Jan. 29, 2016. The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday said it would convene an International Health Regulations emergency committee on the Zika virus to ascertain whether the outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern.(Xinhua/Kent Gilbert) (jp) (sp)

A man had contracted the virus after visiting a country where it was being actively transmitted, and his female partner, who had not recently traveled to a Zika-affected country, had also tested positive for Zika, said a statement from the ministry.

A doctor examines a larva of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the carrier of Zika virus, in a laboratory of the Ministry of Health, in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Jan. 29, 2016. The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday said it would convene an International Health Regulations emergency committee on the Zika virus to ascertain whether the outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern.(Xinhua/Kent Gilbert) (jp) (sp)
A doctor examines a larva of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the carrier of Zika virus, in a laboratory of the Ministry of Health, in San Jose, Costa Rica, on Jan. 29, 2016. The World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday said it would convene an International Health Regulations emergency committee on the Zika virus to ascertain whether the outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern.(Xinhua/Kent Gilbert) (jp) (sp)
Both had now fully recovered and suffered only mild symptoms.

Two potential modes of transmission were being considered: through unprotected sex, or the woman being bitten by an infected mosquito brought into the country in her partner’s luggage.

There was limited scientific evidence to suggest the virus could be sexually transmitted, said the statement.

The couple’s property was under surveillance for any exotic mosquitoes, but none had yet been detected.

The risk to the wider public was extremely low and the species of mosquito that could spread the virus was not native to New Zealand.

In February, the ministry said that eight Zika cases had been confirmed in New Zealand this year, all affecting travellers who had recently been in the South Pacific nations of Tonga, Samoa and American Samoa.

In 2014, New Zealand had 57 Zika notifications, and last year six.

Source: Xinhua

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