Nana Otu Dankwa, USAG IIRS answering questions from journalists during the press conference

Nana Otu Dankwa, USAG IIRS answering questions from journalists during the press conference

The University Students Association of Ghana (USAG) has raised serious concerns with some perceived anomalies in Ghana?s education sector and has come out with some recommendations and possible suggestions that can help correct same. The Association believes the concerns which are mainly about the academic curriculum of tertiary institutions, as well as the style of lecturing of some Professors, when corrected will resolve the key issue of unskilled graduates among others.

At a press conference in Cape Coast University last Thursday to herald the Association?s elections for new National officers, they were of the view that their current curriculum which is expected to fix the biases and industrial problems of the economy have little complementarities at the industrial front. ?It is even more a sad spectacle to announce that our current tertiary curriculum is composed of modules that have no or little bearing on the practical and critical skills required to excel at the job market,? Nana Otu Dankwa, who is the Information and International Relations Secretary for USAG stated.

According to him, USAG is of the view that time has come for all major stakeholders of the academia especially the country?s universities and government to revisit the defects of the tertiary academic curriculum, because despite the rapid expansion of university enrolment, concerns continue to be raised about the ability of universities to produce the kind of graduates who can drive Ghana?s economy forward.

?Many have bemoaned a perceived gap between skills acquired by graduates and the needed skills required by the labour market. At a national stakeholders forum on bridging the gap between the academia and the world of work facilitated by the MOE in 2014, the Association of Ghana Industries and Ghana Employers Association bemoaned the seaming poor connection between education in Ghana and the world of work attributing it to a grave mismatch between what is studied in the classroom and what is required to deliver on the world of work,? he stated.

USAG is also blaming the style of lecturing of some tutors as a major cause of the poor quality of graduates in the system. According to Otu Dankwa, ?If this devastating trend is positively revisited it will strongly deter university students from joining national unemployment associations but rather augment the efforts of government through innovative and creative thinking to establish individual jobs.?

Read the full Press Statement of the Association:

PRESS CONFERENCE ORGANIZED BY THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION OF GHANA ON THE GRAVE DEFECTS OF UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CURRICULUM (23/07/2015)

INTRODUCTION

After the 1948 riot in the history of Ghana the committee that was formed to ascertain the causes of the pandemonium partly included in their report how it had become relevant for successive governments to revise the educational curriculum to suit the industrial domain as well as the cultural heritage of our beloved motherland. Three score years later, the vast part of this same curriculum has graduated into a different phenomenon and ironically today, it is still being used to teach in our tertiary institutions especially the universities. The USAG believes that our so called acclaimed curriculum which is supposed to fix the biases and industrial problems of the economy as we speak have extremely very few complementarities at the industrial front. It is even more a sad spectacle to announce that our current tertiary curriculum is composed of modules that have no or little bearing on the practical and critical skills required to excel at the job market. The press, ladies and gentlemen, of what essence is our education if its curriculum adopted to enhance learning is derelict and silent in solving economic bottlenecks. USAG vehemently believes that the time is ripe and that time is now for all the major stakeholders of the academia especially our universities and government to revisit the defects of our tertiary academic curriculum. Despite the rapid expansion of university enrolment, there are serious concerns about the ability of universities to produce the kind of graduates who can drive Ghana?s economy forward. Though there exist not enough scientific studies commissioned in Ghana to support the above claim, USAG by far is not the only stakeholder registering her displeasure about this unwarranted phenomenon. Many have bemoaned a perceived gap between skills acquired by graduates and the needed skills required by the labour market. At a national stakeholders forum on bridging the gap between the academia and the world of work facilitated by the MOE in 2014, the Association of Ghana Industries and Ghana Employers Association bemoaned the seaming poor connection between education in Ghana and the world of work attributing it to a grave mismatch between what is studied in the classroom and what is required to deliver on the world of work. A chairman of the national development planning commission Dr. Nii Moi Thompson reportedly, in expressing worry over the situation aforementioned described university graduates as half baked. This spectacle to USAG is worrying a trend that must be reversed.

RECOMMENDATION BY USAG

USAG believes that university curriculum ought to be consistently revised to be abreast with changing global demands for the various programs of study. In so doing government and all other stakeholders must be mindful of the fact that adequate funding is a perquisite to the achievement of this recommendation. Stakeholders of the academia must also be ready and willing to support universities (both public and private) with right tools to offer the required practical training for students? development.  For instance, there are lot of teaching laboratories that ought to be rehabilitated. Many do not have the requisite equipment at all. Others too are stocked with obsolete equipment which turns to render the graduates ?obsolete? before churned out to offer solutions to national problems towards development.  The obvious results we seek as a nation through this arrangement is an ?obsolete? development.Lastly, our curriculum should be designed in conformity with our environment and culture. For instance there are a lot of theories that are non-applicable to Ghana rather courses such as basket weaving, kente and smock weaving etc must be introduced into the university curriculum to enable students gain ready market for their skills after completion. We also do not believe that the current academic standards of university education in Ghana is a researched based one and as such implore  all major stakeholders to help assume a different face. A positive one at that.

STYLE OF LECTURING

It is quite a pity if not extremely hilarious that in this day and age some lecturers still use the unproductive chew and pour syndrome way to adjudge best students. Students who fall below this so called standard and yet can explain issues (questions) from their  own intelligence point of view though commiserating with the dictates of a lecturer?s  question usually fails and hardly gets the class needed. No wonder industries continue to receive graduates who are only bookish and can?t translate the knowledge acquired in school unto the job market. USAG by this press briefing calls on government via the outfit of MOE to reconsider this sad spectacle. If this devastating trend is positively revisited it will strongly deter university students from joining national unemployment associations but rather augment the efforts of government through innovative and creative thinking to establish individual jobs. This also, the leadership of USAG believes must be addressed in tandem or in conformity with the entrepreneurial tenets of standard academic curriculum.

Thank you.

Signed

NANA OTU DARKO JOSHUA

PRESS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SECRETARY

0272070409 

DERRICK OSEI-POKU

PRESIDENT 

Source: Jeorge Wilson Kingson, spynewsagency.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.