(From L-R)Ethiopian Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn, Guinean President Alpha Conde, Benin President Thomas Boni Yayi, French President Francois Hollande, Gabon President Ali Bongo and Ghana President John Dramani Mahama hold a press conference following a lunch at the Elysee Palace to honor the African presidents involved in sustainable development regarding the COP21 in Paris, France, Nov.10, 2015. The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21) will take place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 in Paris, with the objective is to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change. (Xinhua/Theo Duval)
(From L-R)Ethiopian Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn, Guinean President Alpha Conde, Benin President Thomas Boni Yayi, French President Francois Hollande, Gabon President Ali Bongo and Ghana President John Dramani Mahama hold a press conference following a lunch at the Elysee Palace to honor the African presidents involved in sustainable development regarding the COP21 in Paris, France, Nov.10, 2015. The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21) will take place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 in Paris, with the objective is to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change. (Xinhua/Theo Duval)

In the 21st session of the Conference of Parties (COP21) in which 195 countries including Kenya are attending, participants are expected to come up with a formula on reducing carbon emissions beyond 2020. Thus making the world more conducive for social and economic activities such as farming.

(From L-R)Ethiopian Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn, Guinean President Alpha Conde, Benin President Thomas Boni Yayi, French President Francois Hollande, Gabon President Ali Bongo and Ghana President John Dramani Mahama hold a press conference following a lunch at the Elysee Palace to honor the African presidents involved in sustainable development regarding the COP21 in Paris, France, Nov.10, 2015. The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21) will take place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 in Paris, with the objective is to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change. (Xinhua/Theo Duval)
(From L-R)Ethiopian Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn, Guinean President Alpha Conde, Benin President Thomas Boni Yayi, French President Francois Hollande, Gabon President Ali Bongo and Ghana President John Dramani Mahama hold a press conference following a lunch at the Elysee Palace to honor the African presidents involved in sustainable development regarding the COP21 in Paris, France, Nov.10, 2015. The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21) will take place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 in Paris, with the objective is to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change. (Xinhua/Theo Duval)
Across the world, the high levels of the carbon dioxide have resulted to the adverse heat waves such as experienced in India mid-2015. Kenya has not been spared either with floods.

The El Nino rains, which started October this year, are expected to extend to January 2016.

Between October and early November, the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) reported displacements of more than 9,000 people in the 14 counties experiencing torrential rains. Further, more than 60 people having lost their lives based on the figures announced by the National Disaster Management Department.

Farmers are equally suffering from the heavy rains as some of their produce and establishments have either been destroyed in the farms or spoilt in the stocks as the roads have been cut off from the main markets.

“Roads in the rural areas are in terrible conditions. It is extremely taxing to maneuvre with a motorbike heavily loaded with harvest in a slippery and muddy road,” said Phillip Muraya, a farmer in Nakuru’s rural area.

Muraya told Xinhua Tuesday that changes in the weather patterns have become so common in the recent days that he finds it challenging to plan for his land preparation and planting.

The farmer said deliberations on how to mitigate the effects of climate change are worth, but the resolutions must trickle down to the villages.

“If you leave information with the few people who will rarely use it to do something different, then you are actually do nothing. The impacts are felt at the grassroots,” he said.

Peter Waweru, who runs the Sustainable Practical Program for Africa (SUPPA) that trains farmers on how to practice environmental friendly farming, said efforts must be made by all stakeholders to disseminate information to the commonly secluded agents influencing emission of the carbon gases.

“You may have recommendations or resolutions, but they can only bring results if they are implemented,” he told Xinhua.

“They must reach the rural farmer who, in every way, interacts with the environment and is involved in activities that increase release of the carbon dioxide into the atmosphere,” he added

According to Waweru, radio is the best channel for disseminating information on mitigating effects of climate change since it is widely accessible.

“Forget about TVs or the newspapers. There are few locals who own TVs in the villages and can even think about a newspaper,” said Waweru, who has interacted with the majority of the rural farmers in the country.

He said the state and non-governmental organizations have a lot to do in changing communities’ socio-economic association with the environment to promote activities necessary to reducing carbon emissions.

“While many other factors are involved in emitting the carbon gases such as industries, farmers cannot be left out,” he insisted.

Availability of resources to finance outreach programs targeting farmers in the rural areas is also critical, according to Moses Njogu, the coordinator of the Modern Youth in Agriculture in Nakuru County.

His concern matches one of the key issues to be discussed in the conference ending December 11: how to fund the poorer countries to deal with climate change.

“It requires planning and resources to sensitize farmers on climate change,” said the official who works with the Ministry of Agriculture.

During his official speech at the conference which kicked off on Monday, Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta noted the efforts made by his government to backtrack global warming, stating that Kenya emitted less than one percent of the global carbon emissions.

The president was emphatic on steady steps made towards promoting adoption of the solar power and generation of the wind and geothermal energy. Enditem

Source: Xinhua

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