The UK is drawing up contingency plans for military action in response to the suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria, Downing Street has said.

No 10 stressed any action would be “proportionate”, lawful and follow agreement with international allies.

David Cameron will also announce later whether Parliament is to be recalled, amid growing pressure from MPs.

A chemical attack is reported to have taken place on Wednesday near Damascus, killing more than 300 people.

Syrian rebels say the Assad government was responsible, but Syria’s foreign minister said on Tuesday this was a “total lie” and accused the US of using it as an “inaccurate excuse” to intervene in the two-year military conflict in the country.

Cameron has returned to London, having cut short his summer holiday to deal with the crisis.

A No 10 spokesman said the UK was considering a “proportionate response” to the attack and was considering a “range of evidence” including that from UN weapons inspectors who visited five sites around Damascus on Monday.

But Downing Street stressed that no decisions had been taken on any response amid discussions with international partners and any action would be “within a strict legal framework” and “within international law”.

Cameron is to chair a meeting of the National Security Council – attended by military and intelligence chiefs and senior ministers – on Wednesday, while Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has cancelled a visit to Afghanistan.

It is understood the most likely military response to Wednesday’s suspected chemical weapons attack would be a one-off or limited guided missile strikes on Syrian military targets fired from US Navy warships.

The Labour Party and several Conservative MPs have insisted the prime minister must explain to Parliament the objectives and legal basis for any UK involvement or co-operation before it happens.

Although the Commons voted on UK military intervention in Iraq in 2003 and Libya in 2011, there is no legal obligation for the government to get parliamentary approval before committing British forces.

The prime minister has the final say on deploying British troops in conflicts, using Royal Prerogative powers.

Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander said it was right to consider all options but he was “not prepared to write the government a blank cheque” with regards to committing British forces and MPs must be allowed to vote on any proposed steps.

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