A month into his presidency, Donald Trump has made some unexpected moves with foreign leaders and caused some disputes and concerns, but he seemed to be gradually finding his rhythm in foreign affairs and hopefully will stick to a win-win path.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves upon his arrival at the White House from Philadelphia, in Washington D.C., the United States, on Jan. 26, 2017. U.S. President Donald Trump wants a 20-percent border tax on all imports from Mexico, said White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Thursday. (Xinhua/Yin Bogu)
U.S. President Donald Trump waves upon his arrival at the White House from Philadelphia, in Washington D.C., the United States, on Jan. 26, 2017. U.S. President Donald Trump wants a 20-percent border tax on all imports from Mexico, said White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Thursday. (Xinhua/Yin Bogu)
The former successful business mogul, who is still coping with a political “cultural shock” in Washington, may find it relatively easier to put his negotiation skills to good use when dealing with foreign affairs.

The first phone call between Chinese President Xi Jinping and the U.S. president earlier this month has sent out some positive signals.

Trump said he fully understands the high significance of the U.S. government’s pursuit of the one-China policy, and pledged to adhere to the one-China policy, a pledge which was warmly received by Xi.

Xi told Trump that China will work with the United States to enhance communication and cooperation so that bilateral ties can advance in a sound and stable manner and yield more fruits to benefit the two peoples and people of all countries in the world.

Affirming a stance on adherence to the one-China policy is a move that Trump must make sooner or later. But his choice of timing — before a scheduled meeting between Trump and the nationalist Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe — may have been carefully chosen to maximize U.S. interests, but in an all-win situation that satisfies all parties.

To Washington, demonstrating a friendly and cooperative relationship with Beijing before engaging in possibly difficult negotiations with Tokyo could be regarded as perfect leverage to pressure Abe for more economic benefits.

Tokyo expects some promises from Trump on the U.S.-Japan alliance to be possibly fulfilled, so Washington’s leverage is more of a signal for it to show utmost sincerity and offer more economic contributions during the Trump-Abe meeting.

Yet Trump’s one stone, two birds strategy is not a loss for Beijing. Respecting each other’s core interests in sovereignty has always been a cornerstone of Sino-U.S. relations.

Such arrangements could help quell some doubts and show that the new U.S. president can be what he claims to be: a champion of negotiation.

Unlike those traditional politicians who are significantly influenced by Realism politics’ zero-sum mindset, Trump, with his business background, could identify well with China’s win-win philosophy.

As Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma has pointed out recently, trade must be based on mutual trust and mutual benefit. Without trust and win-win, a business deal could not be reached.

There is a possibility that Trump’s business background could give the U.S. president a fresh perspective on foreign policy, and produce more tangible results for the United States and China, two economic and political heavyweights, and for the world.

However, the new, non-traditional U.S. administration should also pay attention to walk its talk on constructive cooperation with China and other countries, so as to cement its much-needed credibility. Enditem

Source: Xinhua writer Luo Jun/NewsGhana.com.gh

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