He, that is Mr. Osei Kyei Mensah-Bonsu, the Parliamentary Majority Leader, may sound rather comical and even despicably insolent to the intelligence of the National Democratic Congress’ Parliamentary Minority, but it is very likely that a dictatorial Mr. Edward Doe Adjaho, having been democratically relieved of the Speaker’s post that he so loved to flaunt before a harried New Patriotic Party’s Parliamentary Minority, may still be calling the shots, as it were, from his retirement home to the NDC’s Parliamentary Minority (See “Doe Adjaho ‘Remote Controlling’ Minority – Mensah-Bonsu” Starrfmonline.com / Ghanaweb.com 7/27/17).

The Kumasi-Suame New Patriotic Party Member of Parliament categorically alleged recently that on the day that embattled Electoral Commissioner Charlotte Kesson-Smith Osei and one of her deputies, Mr. Amadu Sulley, were meeting with the Full-House membership of our National Assembly, Mr. Adjaho had called several of the parliamentary minority leaders to prevail on the latter to insist that the press was barred from the proceedings. It is quite likely that Mr. Mensah-Bonsu is telling the truth, and that the Parliamentary Minority Whip, Mr. Muntaka Mubarak, was jiving when he insisted that the NDC parliamentary minority was fully capable of sticking it to the NPP’s parliamentary majority, and did not need the remote-control leadership or guidance of the former Speaker of the House to do so.

To put any debate to rest, the NDC’s leaders could consent to having their phone records verified with their mobile-phone carriers, if, indeed, the have nothing to hide, vis-à-vis the fact of whether former Speaker Adjaho has been leading them, literally, by their noses. But I am not holding my breath here, because I know Messrs. Iddrisu and Mubarak would be lightning-quick to invoke their inalienable constitutional right to privacy. And so we are effectively reduced to the no-win situation of the proverbial “His Word Against His Word.” In other words, it is the word of the Parliamentary Majority Leader against the word of the Parliamentary Minority Chief Whip. I wouldn’t want to waste my time here either, in attempting to establish which of these two men is the more credible.

As far as I have been able to verify, based primarily on my critical observations of these two men from my relatively remote, albeit quite objective political perch here, in the New York City Metropolitan Area, Mr. Mubarak’s word is as good as that of Mr. Mensah-Bonsu. And so I guess it is, by all accounts, a draw; and we must quickly move on to far more pressing and/or important business. Indeed, where Mr. Mensah-Bonsu comes up on top, as it were, is the quite predictable demand, from the NDC’s parliamentary operatives, that no media personnel be present when the Electoral Commissioner and her deputy met with a plenary session of the House. It was predictable because ever since she was appointed to her job by former President John Dramani Mahama some two-and-odd years ago, Mrs. Osei has always been widely perceived to be on a mission to rigging elections in order to ensure that the National Democratic Congress was retained, willy-nilly, at the Flagstaff House.

  Her personal pronouncements have not helped to dispel such negative perception, especially recently when the EC Chair alleged that in the wake of Election 2016, one of her deputies had transferred some votes in favor of the Akufo-Addo-led and now-ruling New Patriotic Party (NPP). Why Mrs. Osei would wait until six months into the Akufo-Addo Administration’s tenure before publicly disclosing this indisputable procedural anomaly, clearly adds up to the mountain of grievances impugning her competence, and the imperative need for the EC Commissioner to be promptly removed and replaced with a more credible and administratively competent leader.

By Kwame Okoampa-Ahoofe, Jr., Ph.D.
English Department, SUNY-Nassau
Garden City, New York
July 29, 2017
E-mail: [email protected]