Journalists and media outlets have been advised to let their reportage and programmes bring hope and confidence to abused children rather than dampen their spirits or negatively portray them in public.

Mr Daniel Selasie Agbenoto, the Programmes Lead at Curious Minds, a non-governmental organization, who gave the advice, said this would ensure that the abused children felt loved by society, which would help them to rebuild their lives.

Mr Agbenoto was speaking at a two-day orientation for media practitioners in Tamale on young people’s reproductive health to update their knowledge on ways to promote the rights of children and sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially girls in the country.

The event was organised by Curious Minds as part of its implementation of the “Get Up, Speak Out,” project with the goal of ensuring that all young people, especially girls and young women, are empowered to realise their sexual and reproductive health and rights in societies that are positive towards young people’s sexuality.

Mr Agbenoto observed that sometimes media reportage exploited and tended to stigmatise abused children as well as put them in danger, leading to their friends and colleagues teasing them, a situation, which worsened their plights.

He appealed to journalists and media outlets to be circumspect in their reportage in order not to infringe on the rights of children, which would further affect their well-being.

He called on the state to enforce laws on children and fully implement policies and conventions to protect them.

Chief Alhassan Amadu Issahaku, former Northern Regional Population Officer, who facilitated a session on gender, called for gender responsive budgeting to address the interest of all in the country.

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