Worried by the rising discontent across the country that is gradually drying out the mortar between the bricks of our country’s unity, making it, to slowly loss its strength, government at all levels in Nigeria have been urged to refocus the education policy towards building self-sufficient, self-motivated and self-employable citizens rather than the greater concentration on paper qualifications.

The Global Principal Coordinator of the Concerned Anambrarians for Development (CAFD) Prince Osita Okeke who make the remark while attending a trade conference in Lagos observed that the focus should be on building the total man who can hold his own no matter the challenges.

“Furthermore, it therefore behoves on the government and the entire citizenry to encourage rapid investment in other sectors of the economy, which apart from generating employment for the teeming unemployed youths will also save Nigeria from economic recession”.

“This means we must fight corruption that is holding Nigeria at the jugular to ensure proper utilization of funds and free flow of funds for investment”, he said.

He proposed dumping the 1999 constitution describing such move as key to winning the war on corruption. “Corruption in Nigeria is at the constitutional heart of the Nigerian system. If anyone really wants to defeat corruption, he must first do away with 1999 constitution which arguably is the godfather of corruption, because it has entrenched and institutionalized lootocracy the fountain head of corruption”, Prince Okeke declared.

The Concerned Anambrarians for Development (CAFD) Principal Coordinator made it categorically clear that the 1999 constitution is the godfather of corruption through the immunity clause 308 (1) which protects and thereby implicitly invites looting by the highest officials, have brazenly set the terrible example that the rest of society have emulated.

Hear him, it is a fraud for the godfather of corruption to give the impression that it is against corruption, and the fraud is compounded when the same constitution empowers the state to fight corruption but then surreptitiously discourages it from doing so. That is triple duplicity and terrible perfidy. Therefore the 1999 constitution has been and remains guarantor of bad governance and the mother of all evils in Nigeria and so long as we have that constitution, nobody can end lootocray and the corruption that it spawns.

CAFD further adviced government that a commitment to get rid of the 1999 constitution is therefore the litmus test of anybody’s seriousness about getting rid of corruption in Nigeria, pointing out that notwithstanding the hot rhotorics of the present government, that the federal government can set the pace on fight against corruption by implementing the 2014 confab report and organise a truly democratic people’s constitution to replace the 1999 constitution that have stymied Nigeria’s development and impoverished her citizens.

The CAFD Boss also proclaimed that similar to the above, to get to the root of Nigeria’s problem that there is an overwhelming need to entrench the culture of rule of law and the willingness of all regardless of status or standing in the society to submit totally to it for the good of all.

“The tragedy of Nigeria is that its leaders and members of the political class generally are yet to imbibe the essential attributes of the rule of law. For them, law is no more than modern tool of fulfilling their political dreams and aspirations, once the levers of government are in the kitty, the concept of supremacy of law ceases to exist. It gives way to an obnoxious philosophy, negative as it were, that make the occupier of public office perpetually unquestionable and beyond reproach”.

“This pernicious concept inures for all time and purposes with the result that a leaders and his cronies invariably get away with atrocities committed while in office and the result on the society is a pandemic of corruption, the CAFD chieftain enthused adding that we can at least start on a clean slate by entrenching a truly people’s democratic constitution”.

Nworah Clement