The implementation of the Mandatory Towing Levy, which seeks to tow broken down and disabled vehicles on roads to reduce accidents, has been suspended, following a public outcry.

Government said a new framework would be formed to clear broken down and disabled vehicles on roads to curb accidents, while the levy policy which was scheduled to commence on July 1 this year, would be re-examined.

The development followed some extensive consultations between the Minister for Transport and stakeholders in the transport sector, a statement issued by the Ministry said.

In 2012, Parliament passed Legislative Instrument 2180 (ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATIONS ,2012) which in regulation 102(3) imposes a mandatory Levy on all owners and persons in charge of motor vehicles, for the purpose of towing broken or disabled vehicles on roads.

The statement noted that the announcement of the policy by the National Road Safety Commission, the implementation agency, attracted public outcry and series of calls for a review, which prompted government to call for a review.

“Upon consultations consequent to the calls, Government has decided to seek a review” it said and explained that the review was to remove the concept of a mandatory towing levy on owners and persons in charge of motor vehicles and trailers.

The review would also ensure that the role of Government in the provision of towing services was limited to only licensing and regulating of service providers.

“Government renews its commitment to the Policy position that broken down vehicles ought to be removed from our roads to avert accidents,” the statement added.

GNA