Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)
Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)

Gabon’s Prime Minister Daniel Ona Ondo on Monday opened a national workshop to discuss “human- wildlife” conflict which has been characterized for years by the devastation of farms by elephants.

Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)
Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)
The two day forum in the capital Libreville was organized in partnership with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Central African Protected Areas Network (RAPAC).

Participants at the meeting are expected to come up with mechanisms to stop elephants straying into farms and to promote peaceful coexistence between human beings and animals.

The Gabonese prime minister recommended the setting up of a fund to compensate victims of human-wildlife conflict.

In 2010, Gabon drafted a national strategy and later came up with an action plan that would cost over 16 million U.S. dollars to manage human-wildlife conflicts.

According to WWF, Gabon is the last refuge for forest elephants, hosting about 48,000 elephants of this species. Enditem

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