Leaders from the Group of Seven countries concluded two days of energy-related talks in the Italian capital Monday without reaching consensus on a joint statement on climate change, due mostly to opposition from the United States.

G-7 ministers did reach agreement in a few other areas, including the need to protect the world’s energy supply from possible cyber attacks, to seek ways to open up international gas markets, and recognizing the value of developing renewable energy sources.

But an agreement on joint language on climate change eluded the ministers, after the U.S. delegation — led by Secretary of Energy Rick Perry — “reserved its opinion” on a proposed text.

According to Carlo Calenda, Italy’s minister for economic development and the host of the two-day G-7 energy summit, U.S. delegates said the newly installed administration of President Donald J. Trump did not yet have a formal position on the international climate change process.

“The U.S. government is in the process of reviewing many of its policies, including policies related to climate change and to the Paris Agreement,” Calenda said, referring to the 2015 deal in which nearly 200 countries agreed to take steps to limit climate change.

The G-7 groups major industrialized economies: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Britain and the United States. Enditem

Source: Xinhua/NewsGhana.com.gh