European Union
European Union

The European Union has released to researchers ? 2.9mn to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment with blood and plasma made from the blood of recovered Ebola patients.

European Union
European Union

This follows consideration of a WHO expert meeting in September which recommended convalescent blood therapies as one of the most promising strategies meriting urgent evaluation as treatment of Ebola disease. As a result of the current outbreak, there are also substantial numbers of survivors to prepare Ebola plasma.

 
The ? 2.9 million grant from the EU will fund the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, University of Liverpool, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Aix-Marseille University, the French Blood Transfusion Service (Etablissement Fran?ais du Sang), Institute Pasteur, and the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.
ITM?s Johan van Griensven, the project?s coordinating investigator, notes that ?Blood and plasma therapy are medical interventions with a long history, safely used for other infectious diseases. We want to find out whether this approach works for Ebola, is safe and can be put into practice to reduce the number of deaths in the present outbreak. Ebola survivors contributing to curb the epidemic by donating blood could reduce fear of the disease and improve their acceptance in the communities.?

 
Blood and plasma from recovered Ebola patients has been used in a limited number of patients previously. For example, during the 1995 Ebola outbreak in Kikwit, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), seven out of eight patients receiving convalescent whole blood survived. However, whether this was due to the transfusions or to other factors is unclear. There is an urgent need to evaluate this therapy in carefully designed studies according to the highest ethical and scientific standards.
EU Research, Innovation and Science Commissioner M?ire Geoghegan-Quinn said in today?s funding announcement that it is urgent to step up medical research on Ebola. According to Geoghegan-Quinn the selected projects ?enlist the best academic researchers and industry to take the fight to this deadly disease.?

 
The Wellcome Trust will provide additional support, enabling unparalleled international collaboration across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors to tackle the Ebola emergency.

 
Jeremy Farrar, Director of the Wellcome Trust, said: ?The Wellcome Trust is delighted to work in partnership with the European Commission to support and help fast-track this critical work. Convalescent serum offers the best potential treatment for Ebola in the short term that could be scaled up if proven effective. Global collaboration of this nature, including clinical researchers and multiple partners from across Europe and West Africa, is both unprecedented and essential if we are to bring the current outbreak under control.?

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