The handout photo from Egypt's state-run news agency MENA shows Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi (C, front) posing for a group photo with the new cabinet members in Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 19, 2015. Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi swore in on Saturday a new government, state media reported, just a week after the previous cabinet resigned following a corruption scandal. (Xinhua/MENA)
The handout photo from Egypt's state-run news agency MENA shows Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi (C, front) posing for a group photo with the new cabinet members in Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 19, 2015. Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi swore in on Saturday a new government, state media reported, just a week after the previous cabinet resigned following a corruption scandal. (Xinhua/MENA)

The former oil minister, Sherif Ismail, took oath early Saturday before President Sisi as the new prime minister.

The handout photo from Egypt's state-run news agency MENA shows Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi (C, front) posing for a group photo with the new cabinet members in Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 19, 2015. Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi swore in on Saturday a new government, state media reported, just a week after the previous cabinet resigned following a corruption scandal. (Xinhua/MENA)
The handout photo from Egypt’s state-run news agency MENA shows Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi (C, front) posing for a group photo with the new cabinet members in Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 19, 2015. Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi swore in on Saturday a new government, state media reported, just a week after the previous cabinet resigned following a corruption scandal. (Xinhua/MENA)
Ismail, Egypt’s third premier after the removal of the Muslim Brotherhood’s President Mohamed Morsi in 2013, was described as one of the best-performing ministers.

During his tenure as an oil minister, Ismail managed to tackle several sensitive files — energy subsidies, gas shortage and oil explorations.

President Sisi appointed Tarek al-Mullah, former head of the state oil company, as petroleum minister.
Al-Mullah faces challenges of easing the country’s energy crisis and attracting more foreign investments to help rebuilding the country’s ailing economy.

The 33-member cabinet contains three women and 16 new members. Ministers of foreign affairs, defense, interior, justice and finance have their office remained.

Two of the newcomers, Education Minister Zaki Badr and Tourism Minister Hisham Zaazou, served in similar posts under toppled former President Hosni Mubarak.

Six ministries were merged in the new cabinet into three: Health and Housing, Education and Technical Education, and High Education and Scientific Research.

A new ministry for the Immigration and Egyptian Expatriates Affairs was created, while ministry of Urban Development was removed.

While the country is still suffering several political and economic problems, after experiencing two major waves of political turmoil, Ismail in his first remarks warned the new government “does not have a magic wand and couldn’t take swift procedures.”

“It will take some time to solve some of the problems,” he was quoted as saying by state television in a press conference.

The new cabinet was sworn in as Egypt is preparing for a long-delayed parliamentary election in October. Electing a new parliament, which Sisi promised to be completed by end of 2015, is the third and final phase of a three-stage future roadmap, including presidential election and a new constitution, announced by Sisi on the removal of Morsi in early July 2013.

On Sept. 12, Sisi accepted the resignation of the cabinet headed by Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab, after the agriculture minister, Salah Helal, was arrested for corruption.

There had been growing calls for Mahlab’s resignation, due to the growing criticism on delays in economic projects and increasing protests by civil servants over a new law that fixed the bonuses.

Also on Saturday, Sisi appointed Mahlab the “assistant to the president for national and strategic projects.” Sisi said in a speech after Mahlab’s resignation that he still “needs Mahlab by his side.”

Later Saturday, Sisi appointed Nabil Sadek as prosecutor general more than two months after his predecessor, Hisham Barakat, was killed in a car bombing on his way to work. Enditem

Source: Xinhua

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