December 28, 1983. Pope JOHN PAUL II in a cell of the Rebbibia prison in Rome speaking with the Turkish terrorist, Mehmet ALI AGCA, who tried to assassinate him on May 13, 1981, apparently for the Bulgarian and Soviet security services The Pope is thought to have pardoned him. Mehmet ALI AGCA was a collaborator of Abdullah CATLI, one of the heads of a Turkish Mafia organization called the Gray Wolves. Mehmet ALI AGCA was sentenced to life imprisonment but was pardoned in the year 2000. Le 28 décembre 1983, dans une cellule de la prison Rebbibia à Rome, le pape JEAN PAUL II parle avec le terroriste turc, Mehmet ALI AGCA qui avait tenté de l'assassiner le 13 mai 1981 pour le compte des services de sécurité bulgares et soviétiques, semble-t-il. Le pape lui aurait accordé son pardon. Mehmet ALI AGCA était un proche d'Abdullah CATLI, un des piliers d'une organisation mafieuse turque, les LOUPS GRIS. Condamné à la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité, Mehmet ALI AGCA est grâcié en 2000.

Mehmet Ali Ağca, who had escaped from a Turkish prison after receiving a life sentence for murdering a journalist, fired four shots with a 9-millimeter pistol.

December 28, 1983. Pope JOHN PAUL II in a cell of the Rebbibia prison in Rome speaking with the Turkish terrorist, Mehmet ALI AGCA, who tried to assassinate him on May 13, 1981, apparently for the Bulgarian and Soviet security services The Pope is thought to have pardoned him. Mehmet ALI AGCA was a collaborator of Abdullah CATLI, one of the heads of a Turkish Mafia organization called the Gray Wolves. Mehmet ALI AGCA was sentenced to life imprisonment but was pardoned in the year 2000. Le 28 décembre 1983, dans une cellule de la prison Rebbibia à Rome, le pape JEAN PAUL II parle avec le terroriste turc, Mehmet ALI AGCA qui avait tenté de l'assassiner le 13 mai 1981 pour le compte des services de sécurité bulgares et soviétiques, semble-t-il. Le pape lui aurait accordé son pardon. Mehmet ALI AGCA était un proche d'Abdullah CATLI, un des piliers d'une organisation mafieuse turque, les LOUPS GRIS. Condamné à la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité, Mehmet ALI AGCA est grâcié en 2000.
December 28, 1983. Pope JOHN PAUL II in a cell of the Rebbibia prison in Rome speaking with the Turkish terrorist, Mehmet ALI AGCA, who tried to assassinate him on May 13, 1981, apparently for the Bulgarian and Soviet security services The Pope is thought to have pardoned him. Mehmet ALI AGCA was a collaborator of Abdullah CATLI, one of the heads of a Turkish Mafia organization called the Gray Wolves. Mehmet ALI AGCA was sentenced to life imprisonment but was pardoned in the year 2000.
Le 28 décembre 1983, dans une cellule de la prison Rebbibia à Rome, le pape JEAN PAUL II parle avec le terroriste turc, Mehmet ALI AGCA qui avait tenté de l’assassiner le 13 mai 1981 pour le compte des services de sécurité bulgares et soviétiques, semble-t-il.
Le pape lui aurait accordé son pardon.
Mehmet ALI AGCA était un proche d’Abdullah CATLI, un des piliers d’une organisation mafieuse turque, les LOUPS GRIS.
Condamné à la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité, Mehmet ALI AGCA est grâcié en 2000.

Two struck the pope in his lower intestine, one in his right arm and one in his left index finger. Two bystanders were also wounded.

Ağca’s accomplice, Oral Çelik, was supposed to set off a diversionary explosion to cover his escape, but lost his nerve and fled. Ağca was tackled and arrested while the pope was rushed to the hospital.

Despite severe blood loss, the pontiff survived, and asked for all Catholics to pray for Ağca, whom he had “sincerely forgiven.”

An Italian court sentenced Ağca to life in prison. The motive for the assassination attempt and its planners remains mysterious — theories and allegations have accused the CIA, the KGB, the Bulgarian government, the Turkish mafia and more.

In 1983, John Paul II visited his would-be assassin. They had a private conversation, and emerged as friends. The pope stayed in touch with Ağca’s family during the latter’s incarceration, and in 2000 requested that he be pardoned.

The request was granted. Ağca was released and deported to Turkey, where he was imprisoned for the life sentence he had fled decades prior.

He converted to Christianity while incarcerated, and was finally released in 2010.

In December 2014, he returned to Rome and laid two dozen white roses at the pope’s tomb.

But in Ghana, the President of the Catholic Bishops Conference, Rev Joseph Osei Bonsu, has suggested the former Yemeni detainees from Guantanamo Bay prison do not deserve the compassion of Ghanaians. Rev Osei Bonsu’s words come in response to President Mahama’s call to Ghanaians to show compassion to the two Yemeni men, Mahmud Umar Muhammad Bin Atef and Khalid Muhammad Salih Al-Dhuby, who were transferred to Ghana last week by the United States government.

The Catholic Bishops Conference have already released a statement calling the government’s decision to accept the former detainees as “wrong” and “dangerous.” Their statement came after other Christian organisations condemned the move. Speaking on Citi Eyewitness news, Rev Osei Bonsu rubbished the President’s call for compassion saying common sense must instead prevail. “The argument for compassion here does not hold. Certainly the bible talks about compassion. We need to be compassionate to people and so on but compassion goes with common sense as well.”

Despite indications the two Yemeni men were detained for 14 years without trial by the United States, Rev Osei Bonsu insists they are dangerous and should not be treated like refugees. “These people are not refugees. They are people who have been accused of being terrorists… the fact that Christ came for sinners doesn’t mean we should endanger our lives,” he said. The catholic priest further advised Ghanaians to reserve their compassion for individuals and groups who actually deserve it. “Compassion should be shown to the right people,” he said. “People in real need. People who cannot go back to their country because of war and so on.” Rev Osei Bonsu remained adamant through out his interview,saying the refugees should not be tolerated. “Compassion goes with common sense and if they are dangerous to the society, they should not be tolerated.”

Source–Newsghana.com.gh/Delali Adogla-Bessa/citifmonline.com/mashable.com

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