Burundian women

An extraordinary meeting of the Burundian council of ministers Tuesday analyzed a report containing suggestions for the amendment of the east African country’s 2005 constitution believed to be “stale and obsolete,” the Burundian government said Thursday.

“A commission mandated to make suggestions for the amendment of the national constitution is at work since March this year and has issued the report. Main suggestions in the report provide a semi-presidential and a semi-parliamentary regime,” said Burundian Government Spokesman Philippe Nzobonariba.

According to him, characteristics of such a regime include electing the president at a direct universal suffrage, who can only be dismissed in case of high treason.

He also said the regime provides the setting up of a post of Prime Minister who is the chief of the government.

Nzobonariba indicated that the president will be assisted by a vice-president chosen from the ethnic group and political party different from those of the president.

Created in March this year, the commission mandated to analyze provisions of the 2005 constitution was given six months to end its assignments, but in September, President Nkurunziza extended its activities for two more months.

The Burundian constitution raised a misunderstanding right before the east African country’s 2015 elections when Burundian President Pierre Nkurunziza wanted to be re-elected for a third term. Some provisions of the Burundian constitution allowed him to run, but others did not allow him to do so.

Nkurunziza was allowed to run the presidential election in 2015 after the country’s Constitutional Court issued a ruling whereby it said that the term from 2005 to 2010 should not be considered as a term because he was not “directly” elected by citizens, but instead by the parliament. Enditem

Source: Xinhua/NewsGhana.com.gh

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