No passengers were aboard the Ethiopian Airlines plane when it caught fire

Boeing has requested airlines to carry out inspections of a transmitter used to locate aircraft after a crash.

A UK regulator had recommended the inspection after a fire broke out on a 787 Dreamliner jet parked at Heathrow airport earlier this month.

It was traced to the upper rear part of the plane where the part – Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) – is fitted.

Boeing said it had asked operators of 717, Next-Generation 737, 747-400, 767 and 777 airplanes to inspect aircraft.

“We’re taking this action following the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) Special Bulletin, which recommended that airplane models with fixed Honeywell ELTs be inspected,” Randy Tinseth, vice president marketing for Boeing Commercial Airplanes, said in a blog post.

“The purpose of these inspections is to gather data to support potential rulemaking by regulators.”

As a result of the fire on the parked Ethiopian Airlines plane, London’s Heathrow airport was closed for 90 minutes.

After the fire, the regulator had asked all Boeing 787s switch off an electrical component until further notice and suggested a safety review of similar components in other aircraft.

In a statement, the AAIB had said that the component needed more “airworthiness action”.

It had said that “it was not clear whether the combustion in the area of the ELT was initiated by a release of energy within the batteries or by an external mechanism such as an electrical short”.

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