It has been said that the folks who still suffer the most from American slavery aren’t Black; they’re White.

A largely rural, mostly uneducated, and still slightly wounded population of folks who are generations removed from the Civil War. ?But they feel it and that point cannot be argued. ?They say they feel it. ?They act like they feel it. ?So we must believe that they are living with some harm from the past.
This group of folks, until very recently, could achieve a higher yearly income than most double doctors of philosophy (or quintuple in the case of one of my former teachers) with the possession of a couple of years of secondary school and six months in a trade school. ?This is no lie or hyperbole. ?I live within eyesight of Boeing (formerly McDonnell Douglass) and my neighbors used to consist of families where the husband worked at Boeing and the wife (in the best of worlds) worked for Ford. ?My neighborhood was also very close to the US Postal Service Bulk Mail Center. ?Sixty and Seventy thousand dollar a year jobs for everyone who was White, a veteran, or had a father who was in the union and brought the son on board.
That is no longer the case in my neighborhood. ?Today, Ford is gone. ?The post office isn’t hiring. ?Boeing has downsized and there were so many law suits when they were doing the lay offs that no one is being hired by a cadre of union buddies anymore. ?No. ?Master had to pay too many millions of dollars for the racial sins of overseers ?Remember when we went through the period of race based hiring and firing practices being brought to court and nearly all blamed on secretaries (i.e..?the infamous eight balls at Texaco)? ? I think, sometimes, that the ability to have someone to blame was the reason for secretarial pools. ?Anyway, that was what was said at the time. ?The truth today is there is no reliable pathway, any more, in these newly united states, for a man with the rudiments of an education to sweat his way to that same sixty or seventy grand. ?It can be done. ?I didn’t say it couldn’t be done. ?What I said was that it is no longer a reliable, constant, consistent, or even feasible option.
Those folks in Texas, Louisiana, and all “secesh”?points in between are angry because they are starving due to a cessation of their diet of White privilege. ?They never read the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal which pronounced a death to manufacturing long before those millions of unemployed feet hit the streets in December of 2008. ?They never took advantage of their unions’ worker re-training programs or for that matter the company tuition reimbursement programs. ?Just as their forefathers became alarmed that they would not rise to the slave-owning planter class and went out and seceded (after that first shot in April 1861) these men are doing the same.
You see, their dreams have been killed. ?More is needed to achieve that dream. ?They would rather shout game over, pick up their marbles and go home. ?To what?
Since the election last week we have seen maps which compared Americans voting in the 19th century to Americans voting in the 20th and 21st centuries. ?It’s sad isn’t it? ?Those images show we haven’t traveled that far. ?What you can’t gain from simply looking at those maps is what I’m about to tell you: it is also a map of US academic attainment. ?It is also a map of US technological access. ?It is also a map which holds strong cursory delineation of locations of institutions of science and mathematics and institutions of external and mythical religiosity (I’m wondering if that is indeed a real word).
Education, technology, and religion are the reasons the last secession was unsuccessful. ?And it is so very disgusting to see that those states have not been able to conjure a better solutions to their own inability to move forward in time, in all those 160 plus years.

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