You don’t need to be a prophet to realize that whoever that personality may be, the life of the most powerful politician of the land is constantly under one form of threat or another, particularly from his most inveterate political detractors, people whom some of his well-intentioned policies may have adversely affected and, of course, people who simply hate and envy the President for any number of reasons, both printable and unprintable (See “President Akufo-Addo Will Be Assassinated – Prophet” Yen.com.gh / Ghanaweb.com 8/7/17).

The good news here is that there are often as many prophets of doom in the land, as there are a legion prophets of good and glad tidings who constantly preach for the protection of the most prominent leaders of the land as well. Which is neither to impugn nor endorse the alleged prediction by Prophet Reynolds Oduro Gyebi that President Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo stands a great risk of being assassinated, unless a National Day of Mourning and Prayer is observed for the President. 

If Prophet Gyebi firmly believes that the best antidote to what he reportedly terms as “the writing of tributes” or eulogies for our slain leaders is for the members of the National Peace Council and all Christians and Muslims to declare a National Day of Prayers, then, by all means, the great man of God can go right ahead and organize such a salutary spiritual event with those religious leaders whose prayers he thinks and believes are potent enough to avert such an abominable, but allegedly all-too-preventable tragedy in waiting.

 It is an open-secret that throughout his public service career, Nana Akufo-Addo has publicly and privately demonstrated that the prayers and prayerfulness of our men and women of God have a significant role in his life. In the Bible, for example, most of the Jewish and Israelite prophets went about their predictions and prophecies with cautionary privacy, such as the Prophet Nathan, who privately but fiercely and forthrightly confronted King David over his ungodly crime of murder and adultery. These days, though, it appears as if our men, and women, of God prefer the sort of cheap publicity conferred by media spotlight, and the overnight fame and fortune that come with such garish self-advertisement. Which is all well and good for those clerics who gloat and/or glory in the same; for, after all, ours are different times with different sets of values and expectations.

Prophet Gyebi has my full support and, I also believe, the support of all Ghanaians, at home and abroad, who believe in the sort of salutary and rapid socioeconomic, political and cultural development that President Akufo-Addo and his cabinet appointees and associates have been espousing and working frantically around the clock, literally speaking, to facilitate its actualization. If he is able to hold his end of the bargain, as it were, I have every hope that by the end of his first term, Nana Akufo-Addo would have qualitatively taken Ghana to heights never reached for decades now.

By Kwame Okoampa-Ahoofe, Jr., Ph.D.
English Department, SUNY-Nassau
Garden City, New York
August 12, 2017
E-mail: [email protected]