vote

The CDD report reveals that 84 percent of Ghanaian voters make their choices during elections based on how they can directly benefit from a particular candidate.

voteThe survey was conducted in ten constituencies with high incidence of poverty, including the Akan Constituency in the Volta Region, Bosome Freho in the Ashanti Region and Odododiodio in the Greater Accra Region.

The study’s objective is to identify factors that influence voter preferences and the voting patterns in the sampled constituencies during parliamentary elections.

The report said Ghanaians are not necessarily bothered about the qualities and capabilities of the candidates in representing them and bring development to their communities, but are more likely to vote for a candidate who gives them handouts or from whom they benefit directly in whatever form.

The situation has no doubt contributed to the mediocre performance on the part of some parliamentarians, who may have won their elections not on the basis of their competence but on their perceived benevolence.

The CDD report therefore recommends continuous voter education to ensure that the electorates take advantage of the opportunity presented by the elections season to elect competent people to represent them.

As part of efforts to address the unfortunate phenomenon, the Integrated Social Development Centre (ISODEC) and other civil society groups have initiated programmes, with the support of STAR Ghana to influence political discourses in the run-up to the November 2016 elections. The ISODEC intervention seeks to create national consciousness around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and to support the political parties to align their party manifestoes to the SDGs.

The SDGs are universally agreed development goals which UN member states are under obligation to pursue between 2015 (when the predecessor Millennium Development Goals lapsed) and 2030. They contain 17 goals, with 169 targets covering a broad range of thematic areas in the development sphere.

These include: ending poverty and hunger, improving access to affordable healthcare, education, water and sanitation.

ISODEC says it expects other stakeholders to initiate their own complimentary steps to divert electioneering discourses from the usually acrimonious and ethnocentric tendencies which tend to undermine peace-building, to focusing on the issues that impact on the socio-economic well-being of the Ghanaian.

It’s long been known that voting in Ghana and many other African countries are influenced by tribal affiliations, party loyalty, financial inducements, and other factors completely unrelated to policies and programmes that could improve the lot of voters, and the study conducted by the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD), which report was launched this week .
The CDD report reveals that 84 percent of Ghanaian voters make their choices during elections based on how they can directly benefit from a particular candidate.

The survey was conducted in ten constituencies with high incidence of poverty, including the Akan Constituency in the Volta Region, Bosome Freho in the Ashanti Region and Odododiodio in the Greater Accra Region. The study’s objective is to identify factors that influence voter preferences and the voting patterns in the sampled constituencies during parliamentary elections.

The report said Ghanaians are not necessarily bothered about the qualities and capabilities of the candidates in representing them and bring development to their communities, but are more likely to vote for a candidate who gives them handouts or from whom they benefit directly in whatever form.

The situation has no doubt contributed to the mediocre performance on the part of some parliamentarians, who may have won their elections not on the basis of their competence but on their perceived benevolence.

The CDD report therefore recommends continuous voter education to ensure that the electorates take advantage of the opportunity presented by the elections season to elect competent people to represent them.

As part of efforts to address the unfortunate phenomenon, the Integrated Social Development Centre (ISODEC) and other civil society groups have initiated programmes, with the support of STAR Ghana to influence political discourses in the run-up to the November 2016 elections. The ISODEC intervention seeks to create national consciousness around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and to support the political parties to align their party manifestoes to the SDGs.

The SDGs are universally agreed development goals which UN member states are under obligation to pursue between 2015 (when the predecessor Millennium Development Goals lapsed) and 2035. They contain 17 goals, with 169 targets covering a broad range of thematic areas in the development sphere. These include: ending poverty and hunger, improving access to affordable healthcare, education, water and sanitation.

ISODEC says it expects other stakeholders to initiate their own complimentary steps to divert electioneering discourses from the usually acrimonious and ethnocentric tendencies which tend to undermine peace-building, to focusing on the issues that impact on the socio-economic well-being of the Ghanaian.

Source: Public Agenda
By Latifa Carlos

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